Just Like That... Bonnie Raitt

Album Info

Album Veröffentlichung:
2022

HRA-Veröffentlichung:
22.04.2022

Label: Redwing Records

Genre: Blues

Subgenre: Electric Blues

Interpret: Bonnie Raitt

Das Album enthält Albumcover

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  • 1Made Up Mind03:40
  • 2Something's Got a Hold of My Heart04:52
  • 3Livin' for the Ones03:04
  • 4Just Like That05:05
  • 5When We Say Goodnight05:00
  • 6Waitin' For You to Blow05:27
  • 7Blame it On Me05:47
  • 8Love So Strong04:31
  • 9Here Comes Love04:15
  • 10Down The Hall04:30
  • Total Runtime46:11

Info zu Just Like That...

Just Like That ... is the first album in more than six years from the Rock And Roll Hall of Famer Bonnie Raitt. On her new album, Raitt continues to draw on all the influences that have shaped her legendary career, while at the same time creating something that articulates the circumstances and challenges that of these unprecedented times.

Just Like That… was recorded in the summer of 2021 in Sausalito, Calif. The players include two longtime members of Raitt’s band, bassist James “Hutch” Hutchinson and drummer Ricky Fataar, as well as two new musicians, Canadian Glenn Patscha on keyboards and backing vocals and Nashville guitarist Kenny Greenberg. Her longtime guitarist/songwriting partner George Marinelli also joined in, playing and singing on “Livin’ for the Ones,” the song they co-wrote for the album.

After a 20-year career, Raitt broke through to the top in the early 90s with her Grammy Award-winning albums, Nick of Time and Luck of the Draw, which featured the hits, “Something To Talk About” and “I Can’t Make You Love Me,” among others. The ten-time Grammy winner was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2000. She will receive a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Special Merit Awards Ceremony and 64th Annual GRAMMY® Nominees Reception event on March 2.

Bonnie Raitt




Bonnie Raitt
In the late '60s, restless in Los Angeles, she moved east to Cambridge, Massachusetts. As a Harvard/Radcliffe student majoring in Social Relations and African Studies, she attended classes and immersed herself in the city's turbulent cultural and political activities. "I couldn't wait to get back to where there were folkies and the antiwar and civil rights movements," she says. "There were so many great music and political scenes going on in the late '60s in Cambridge." Also, she adds, with a laugh, "the ratio of guys to girls at Harvard was four to one, so all of those things were playing in my mind."

Raitt was already deeply involved with folk music and the blues at that time. Exposure to the album 'Blues at Newport 1963' at age 14 had kindled her interest in blues and slide guitar, and between classes at Harvard she explored these and other styles in local coffeehouse gigs. Three years after entering college, Bonnie left to commit herself full-time to music, and shortly afterward found herself opening for surviving giants of the blues. From Mississippi Fred McDowell, Sippie Wallace, Son House, Muddy Waters, and John Lee Hooker she learned first-hand lessons of life, as well as invaluable techniques of performance.

"I'm certain that it was an incredible gift for me to not only be friends with some of the greatest blues people who've ever lived, but to learn how they played, how they sang, how they lived their lives, ran their marriages, and talked to their kids," she says. "I was especially lucky as so many of them are no longer with us."

Word spread quickly of the young red-haired blueswoman, her soulful, unaffected way of singing, and her uncanny insights into blues guitar. Warner Bros. tracked her down, signed her up, and in 1971 released her debut album, 'Bonnie Raitt'. Her interpretations of classic blues by Robert Johnson and Sippie Wallace made a powerful critical impression, but the presence of intriguing tunes by contemporary songwriters, as well as several examples of her own writing, indicated that this artist would not be restricted to any one pigeonhole or style.

Over the next seven years she would record six albums. 'Give It Up', 'Takin' My Time', 'Streetlights', and 'Home Plate' were followed in 1977 by 'Sweet Forgiveness', which featured her first hit single, a gritty Memphis/R&B arrangement of Del Shannon's "Runaway." Three Grammy nominations followed in the 1980s, as she released 'The Glow', 'Green Light', and 'Nine Lives'. A compilation of highlights from these Warner Bros. albums (plus two previously unreleased live duets) was released as 'The Bonnie Raitt Collection' in 1990. All of these Warner albums have been digitally remastered and re-released. In between sessions, when not burning highways on tour with her band, she devoted herself to playing benefits and speaking out in support of an array of worthy causes, campaigning to stop the war in Central America; participating in the Sun City anti-apartheid project; performing at the historic 1980 No Nukes concerts at Madison Square Garden; co-founding MUSE (Musicians United for Safe Energy); and working for environmental protection and for the rights of women and Native Americans.

After forging an alliance with Capitol Records in 1989, Bonnie achieved new levels of popular and critical acclaim. She won four Grammy Awards in 1990—three for her 'Nick of Time' album and one for her duet with John Lee Hooker on his breakthrough album 'The Healer'. Within weeks, 'Nick of Time' shot to number one (it is now certified quintuple platinum). 'Luck of the Draw' (1991, seven-times platinum) brought even more success, firing two hit singles—"Something to Talk About" and "I Can't Make You Love Me"—up the charts, and adding three more Grammys to her shelf. The double-platinum 'Longing in Their Hearts', released in 1994, featured the hit single "Love Sneakin' Up On You" and was honored with a Grammy for Best Pop Album. It was followed in 1995 by the live double-CD and film 'Road Tested' (now available on DVD). Along with her own set, it features duets with Bryan Adams, Jackson Browne, Bruce Hornsby, Ruth Brown, Charles Brown, and Kim Wilson.

After all the awards and honors and decades of virtually non-stop touring under her belt, Bonnie continued her activism and guesting on numerous friends' records, including Ruth Brown, Charles Brown, Keb' Mo, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, and Bruce Cockburn, as well as tribute records for Richard Thompson, Lowell George, and Pete Seeger. She picked up another Grammy in 1996 for Best Rock Instrumental Performance for her collaboration on "SRV Shuffle" from the all-star 'Tribute to Stevie Ray Vaughan', and continued her "dual career," performing with her father, John, in concerts as well as on his Grammy-nominated album, 'Broadway Legend', released in 1995.

In 1998, she returned to the studio with a new collaborative team to create Fundamental, one of her most exploratory projects, signaling her growing desire to "shake things up a bit." Inspired by the music of Zimbabwean world-beat master Oliver Mtukudzi, Bonnie wrote "One Belief Away," the first single, with Paul Brady and Dillon O'Brian.

In March of 2000, Bonnie was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame; this was followed by her welcome into the Hollywood Bowl Hall of Fame, along with her father, in June 2001.

After the Fundamental tour, she went back into the studio with her veteran road band to record 'Silver Lining', released in 2002. Featuring Bonnie's stunning interpretation of the David Gray-penned title track, the Grammy-nominated "Gnawin' On It," and the hit single "I Can't Help You Now," 'Silver Lining' was considered by many critics to be one of the best albums of her career. She promoted the album with a lengthy world tour that included her Green Highway Festival and an eco-partnership promoting BioDiesel fuel, the environment, and alternative energy solutions at shows and benefits along the way. In 2003, she released the retrospective 'The Best of Bonnie Raitt' on Capitol.

Raitt stayed busy with more guest appearances, including the stunning duet "Do I Ever Cross Your Mind" on Ray Charles' final release 'Genius Loves Company', which won the Grammy award for Album of the Year, and a duet on the Grammy-winning album 'True Love' by Toots & The Maytals. Her 1989 breakthrough album 'Nick of Time', was remixed for surround sound, and released by Capitol Records in 2004 as a DVD-Audio, garnering a Grammy nomination in the newly created category, Best Surround Sound Album.

In 2003, she also participated in Martin Scorsese's acclaimed PBS series, 'The Blue's, performing two songs in Wim Wenders' film, 'The Soul of a Man', and joining the all-star cast of 'Lightning in a Bottle', the live feature concert film on the Blues directed by Antoine Fuqua. She also contributed songs for two Disney movies, 'The Country Bears' and 'Home on the Range'. She played guitar on a track on Stevie Wonder's album 'A Time To Love', and appeared in the TV/DVD tribute 'Music l0l: Al Green'. … Visit: http://www.bonnieraitt.com/bio

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