Get Yourself Outside Yonder Mountain String Band

Album Info

Album Veröffentlichung:
2022

HRA-Veröffentlichung:
25.02.2022

Das Album enthält Albumcover

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Formate & Preise

FormatPreisIm WarenkorbKaufen
FLAC 88.2 $ 12,30
  • 1Beside Myself04:08
  • 2I Just Can't02:13
  • 3Small House03:27
  • 4If Only03:44
  • 5Up This Hill03:06
  • 6No Leg Left04:56
  • 7Out Of The Pan02:12
  • 8Into the Fire02:38
  • 9Broken Records04:48
  • 10Change of Heart04:29
  • 11Suburban Girl03:23
  • Total Runtime39:04

Info zu Get Yourself Outside

With its latest album, “Get Yourself Outside,” Colorado-based quintet Yonder Mountain String Band once again echoes out into the universe its place as not only a pioneering jam-grass act, but also one of the most innovative, intricate groups in the live music scene — something the groundbreaking ensemble has proudly held high for the better part of a quarter-century.

“The whole thing has always been about the energy and the connection with all of us onstage and everyone out in the audience,” says guitarist Adam Aijala. “And with this third iteration of Yonder Mountain, we’re really tapping into that onstage connection once again.”

This “third chapter” of YMSB is one of my facets. Aside from the obvious nature of the new album, it’s a complete restart for the live music industry. Internally, it’s also a fresh start for the group in welcoming its newest member, mandolinist Nick Piccininni.

Recorded during the shutdown at Cinder Sound Studio (Gunbarrel, Colorado) with producer John McVey, “Get Yourself Outside” (Frog Pad Records) is a musical odyssey of string instruments and sonic textures.

There’s the usual foot-stomping jingles and sorrowful ballads that reside at the core of the Yonder Mountain signature tone. But, there’s also a deep, honest sense of renewal and rejuvenation running through the heart of the record.

And, by being back on the road, Yonder Mountain has been taking note of its long, bountiful journey from its foundation in 1998 to the here and now — with its 25th anniversary just around the corner.

It’s also a testament to the life and legacy of Yonder Mountain that three of the founding members — Aijala, Kaufmann and banjoist Dave Johnston — remain at the helm of this American musical institution, something complemented and accelerated in recent years by the fiery fiddle work of Allie Kral, who joined the group in 2015.

Looking back on those early days, the members of Yonder Mountain can’t help but shake their heads in awe — of where it all originated from, and what the live music landscape looked like at that time.

From selling out Red Rocks Amphitheatre at a time when that was unheard of for a string act, to standing at the microphone in front of tens of thousands at festivals like Bonnaroo, Yonder Mountain was the initial spark in an acoustic inferno decades ago that endures headlong into the 21st century — one burning brightly in an ongoing tidal wave movement that now includes marquee names like Billy Strings, Greensky Bluegrass, and The Infamous Stringdusters.

Yonder Mountain String Band




Yonder Mountain String Band
Pioneers. Innovators. These are but a few of the monikers that Yonder Mountain String Band has worn since their inception. From the first Yonder shows in the fall of 1998 to their drive-in tour of 2020, this touring force has brought their adventurous musical spirit to countless venues for nearly a quarter century.

Yonder Mountain’s early success was fueled by their desire to make a sound distinctly their own, whether performed on crowded stages or selling out the hallowed Red Rocks Amphitheater. Their traditional take on bluegrass sound was fused with their diverse musical influences ranging anywhere from punk rock to the Grateful Dead.

The combination of the band’s unique personalities extended musical improvisations, their jam band fan culture and their collaborative effort on writing and arranging original songs which span multiple genres—attracted more of a freewheeling jam crowd than the traditional bluegrass scene which, in turn, exposed a whole new generation of fans to Bluegrass.

No band that has stood the test of time is without transformation and Yonder Mountain has had their fair share of change. In 2014, Yonder Mountain and Jeff Austin announced they were parting ways. Austin went on to tour full time with his side project, The Jeff Austin Band, with a rotating lineup of musicians playing with him until his unexpected death in 2019.

Yonder’s ninth studio album will be released in late 2021. It features founding members Adam Aijala on guitar, Ben Kaufmann on bass, Dave Johnston on banjo, alongside the 2015 addition of Allie Kral on fiddle, and newcomer, multi-instrumentalist Nick Piccininni handling duties on mandolin, second fiddle, and anything stringed.

Yonder Mountain String Band is a quintessential ensemble honing its craft night after night on the road; the result is music that doesn’t stand still, it’s always progressing and breaking unprecedented ground.



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